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Boot Dryer Uses Floor Or Stove Heat
“It works amazingly well,” says Freeman Miller about the high rise boot dryer he built to dry wet boots, shoes, and gloves.
“There are electric shoe dryers on the market, but they’re usually made of plastic and aren’t designed for constant use by farmers. My boot dryer is made from sandblasted and powder-coated mild steel. It works great whether you use it on top of a wood-fired stove or over a floor vent,” says Miller.
The dryer comes with a pair of 23-in. tall, 2-in. dia. pipes welded onto a 12 by 8-in. steel plate that has corresponding holes drilled into it. The plate sets on four 2-in. tall metal legs. Elbows welded on top of the pipes face away from each other, and are cut at a 60-degree angle to create a large opening. A curved, 1/4-in. rod above the elbow holds the boot in place above the opening.
A model designed for 2 pairs of boots is also available and has 2 smaller pipes in the middle. “Some people dry their boots on the big pipes, and their gloves or children’s boots on the smaller pipes,” says Miller. “Most people use their floor vents, but the Amish use their wood-fired stoves. The large opening in each elbow allows warm, dry air to circulate throughout the entire boot, including the toe area, and exit at the top of the boot.
“One Amish man said his heavy insulated boots got sopping wet after his basement was flooded with 6 in. of water. He dumped the water out of the boots that evening, and by morning they were completely dry from tip to toe.”
The single pair boot dryer retails for $69 plus S&H; the double pair for $98 plus S&H. Dealer inquiries are welcome.  
Contact: FARM SHOW Followup, Freeman Miller, Eagle Eye Welding, 27392 253rd St., Pierz, Minn. 56364 (ph 320 468-6030, ext. 2)


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2021 - Volume #45, Issue #3