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“Powered” Bale Fork Squeezes Loads From The Side

“Our new loader-mounted bale fork is designed with squeeze arms that handle small square bales from their ends or sides, which makes it great for stacking. It’ll work on small tractors and skid loaders, picking up a block of 8 bales at a time,” says Cheryl Hall, Paradise Valley, Nevada.
  The “Lil Squeeze” bale fork has a 1,250-lb. capacity and comes with a telescoping-tube design. It consists of a pair of squeeze arms attached to a 6-ft. long rectangular steel backstop, which mounts on tractor loader arms in place of a bucket. The squeeze arms are made from 3-in. steel tubing. One arm is stationary. An enclosed hydraulic cylinder moves the other arm inward to grasp the bale in a tight hug.
  “It’s a simple, cost efficient way to move bales. We use the heck out of it on our farm,” says Hall, who along with her husband Will is in the custom haying business. “There are commercial bale squeezes for round and big square bales, but as far as I know none for small square bales. We often use it on our Massey Ferguson 1250 25 hp. tractor.
  “Hauling up to 8 bales at a time saves a lot of wear and tear on your tractor and greatly increases your hay handling production. It also works great for other jobs. For example we’ve used it to move pallets, feed troughs, Rubbermaid water troughs, and cattle panels. Will has even used it to lift a 4-wheeler off a truck flatbed and move it into our shop to replace the engine. He positioned one fork on front of the 4-wheeler and one on back and then squeezed one arm inward.”
  Hall suggests calling for specific pricing information.
  Contact: FARM SHOW Followup, Will and Cheryl Hall, P.O. Box 12, Paradise Valley, Nevada 89426 (ph 775 578-0008 or cell ph 775 304-3240; hallnhay5@gmail.com).


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2017 - Volume #41, Issue #5