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1990 - Volume #14, Issue #2, Page #03
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Pop up cattle guard

"It pops back up after you drive over it and can be easily transported in your pickup," says Lee Combs, Holdenville, Okla., about his new portable "pop-up" cattle guard.
The patented unit consists of three aprons mounted inside a steel framework held 6 in. above ground. The aprons are made up of 2-in. dia. oil drilling pipe spaced 4 in. apart. The ends of two hinge pipes on either side of the center apron are pinned to coil springs mounted inside a pair of 5-in. dia., 3-ft. high steel posts on each side of the guard. When a vehicle goes over the cattle guard, it forces the aprons down. As soon as the vehicle's rear wheels leave the guard, the springs pop the aprons back up.
"You can put it in your pickup and move it to any location. It rests on dry ground and is raised 6 in. so it always stays clean. The 2-in. dia. pipes are so strong that heavy trucks can't bend them. Spring tension can be adjusted -by moving a pin inside each post. Installation takes only about an hour," says Combs.
The guards are available in 10, 12, 14, and 16-ft. widths. A 10-ft. model sells for under $500.
Non-spring cattle guards forming a solid inverted "V" are also available for use between pastures. They're designed for use by pickups or trucks but not cars. A 10-ft. model sells for under $400 and a 16-ft. model for under $900.
Contact FARM SHOW Followup, Lee Combs, Rt. 4, P.O. Box 185, Holdenville, Okla. 74848 (ph 405 379-5842).
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1990 - Volume #14, Issue #2