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1987 - Volume #11, Issue #5, Page #04
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Home built spreader

"This is not a totally new idea but it worked out so well I thought other farmers might like to know about it," says Bob Johnson, Bagley, Minn., about his built-from-scratch truck spreader.
"About three years ago I realized I needed a larger liquid spreader and found the cost of a 3,000 gal. commercial trailer-type spreader to be in the range of $10,000 to $12,000. Not wanting to spend that much, I set out to see if I could put one together myself for less.
"After a couple weeks shopping around in my spare time, I located a 1960 International #190 truck and bought it for $1,750. It has a twin screw, which is a must for traveling in fields, and has a straight 5-speed transmission with a pto, just what I needed for this project. The 401 cu. in. gas-powered V-8 has plenty of power under all conditions.
"The frame extends 18 ft. behind the cab so I had a welding shop build a tank to fit it, following my specs, for a total cost of $1,740. The tank has two baffles in it and I painted the inside with an epoxy paint to make it easier to clean.
"Next I needed an unloading system. Using two U-joints, I ran a long shaft from the truck pto to the back of the tank. Then I built an impeller and housing, patterning it after one I'd owned on a smaller spreader. Then I built a valve and seat to start and stop the flow of manure into the impeller. The impeller is driven by a short roller chain from the pto shaft. Controls for the pto and the valve are mounted in the cab. Cost of unloading system came to $350.
"The final job was to paint it. A rented sprayer ($10) and $35 worth of paint, along with a few more hours, brought the total cost of the truck spreader to $3,885. Because it can be classed as a self-propelled manure spreader, no license or insurance is required. It works like a charm and saves time on longer hauls on roads."
Contact: FARM SHOW Followup, Bob Johnson, Rt. 1, Box 287, Bagley, Minn. 56621 (218 694-6798).

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1987 - Volume #11, Issue #5