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1987 - Volume #11, Issue #5, Page #20
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Innovative Ideas From Out Of The Past

In 1905, Oliver made this twin-engine 880 tractor. It used single front and rear axles, but had dual transmissions. The unique tractor was wired for remote control.

The Minneapolis Moline M-504 was one of the first American made tractors to offer a mechanical front wheel drive option. Introduced in 1962, the front wheel drive was automatically disengaged when the transmission was shifted into fifth gear.

To extend usefulness of its crawler Cletrac HG tractors, the Cleveland Tractor Co., in the mid 40's, offered a 2-row cultivatorwhich converted into a 2-row planterand an integral mower.

The Pulverator, made by General Implement Corp., of Evansville, Ind., was an early 1930's attempt to reduce tillage operations. It featured a pto-driven pulverizing mehanism on the rear half of each plow share.

This self-propelled Sageng Combination Thresher, introduced in about 1905, had a 70 hp 4-cyl. engine that powered the machine while it was threshing, and from job to job.

The IH Electrall system, introduced in 1954, was designed mainly for use on Farmall Super M-TA and 400 tractors for use as a standby or portable electric power generator. However, it could also be used to power the model 55 baler. The baler was fitted with a 10 hp electric motor in lieu of a gas engine or pto drive.


EDITOR'S NOTE: If you enjoy this collection of innovative ideas from out of the past, you'll enjoy the booklets from which they came. They're excerpts from a long parade of "Farm Equipment Oddities" featured in two 20-page booklets assembled by Daryl Miller. Volume 1 covers "oddities" sold by Allis Chalmers, J.I. Case, Cockshutt, Ford, International and various shortline companies. Vol. 2 covers Deere, Massey, Minneapolis-Moline, Oliver and shortline companies.
"Many of these machines were well designed but were either ahead of their time, or failed because of poor financial conditions. Others are prototypes or early models of machines that were later made in large numbers," says Miller, who adds that his booklets "make great Christmas or birthday gifts." They sell for $2.25 each, or both for $4.00.
For more information, contact: FARM SHOW Followup, Miller Books, Box 277, Battle Creek, Iowa 51006 (ph 712 365-4873).

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1987 - Volume #11, Issue #5