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2005 - Volume #29, Issue #2, Page #28
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"Swing-Out" Chute Loads From The Ground Or Dock

It lets me use my existing semi livestock trailer to load and unload cattle either from the ground or from a loading dock, completely eliminating the need for a separate loading chute," says LeRoy Stotts, Seiling, Okla., about the conversion chute he built on back of his semi-trailer. The LT Dock/Groundload conversion took first place in this year's National Farm Bureau inventions contest.
  In transport position, the chute adds only 3 ft. of length to the trailer. It's built in two sections. One section mounts directly behind the rear door of the trailer and has a built-in ramp that's raised or lowered as needed for loading from docks. The other section swings over behind the first section on a hinge. It extends the ramp low enough to load and unload from the ground.
  It takes less than 60 seconds to convert from dock loading to ground loading or visa versa. Just unhook the groundload section and swing it around to match up to the dock loading section.
  Stotts says he came up with the idea after using a pot-type semi-trailer to load and unload cattle at auctions and also to deliver cattle to scattered pastures. "I was often frustrated because I needed a second person and a second vehicle to follow behind me pulling a portable livestock loading chute. Yet I didn't want to spend the money for a new groundload semi trailer.
  "My dock/ground load conversion eliminates the need to spend time setting up a portable chute, backing the trailer up to it, and later reassembling the chute for transport," says Stotts. "Another advantage is that it works with a straight floor trailer or a pot-type semi-trailer, which has more hauling capacity than a commercial groundload trailer."
  According to Stotts, the prices for semi trucks have been dropping while the prices for 1-ton pickups have been increasing. "Many ranchers are now buying good used semi trucks instead of buying 1-ton pickups. New commercial ground load trailers are expensive, and used ones keep their value so much that many people can't afford to buy them. On the other hand, in many cases you can buy a good 6-year-old semi truck for less than you'd pay for a 1-ton pickup. You can buy a used pot-type semi-trailer or straight floor trailer and then install my conversion kit for a lot less money. A lot of guys use their semi tractor to pull a grain trailer during harvest, and a livestock trailer later on."
  The unit comes with new lights and DOT reflective tape and a top light package. Models built from either steel or aluminum are available.
  Contact: FARM SHOW Followup, LeRoy Stotts, RR 2, Box 98, Seiling, Okla. 73663 (ph 580 922-4973; website: www. ltgroundload.com).
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2005 - Volume #29, Issue #2