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1987 - Volume #11, Issue #5, Page #21
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Tube line bale wrapper

"It's the first and only machine of its kind in the world," says David Anderson, Scottish farmer and inventor of the new "Tube-Line" wrapper for big round bales of hay, straw or silage.
The new-style machine progressively wraps each bale in 18-in. wide plastic to form a continuous sealed line. "With the flat face of each bale pressed firmly against its neighbor, only the outer circumference is wrapped. This eliminates the need for end-sealing individual bales and cuts the usage of plastic by half," Anderson told FARM SHOW. "Once the tube is formed, there is no further handling until the bales are used."
The "Tube-Line" wrapper consists of a hydraulic pull-bar which feeds bales through the wrapping chamber, a film dispenser which orbits the bale as it is fed through, and a sloping roller-conveyor which eases the line of bales to the ground.
Bales are loaded onto the feed table with a loader-mounted spear. Each bale is pulled (by two long-stroke hydraulic arms) through the wrapping chamber to form a continuous, unbroken line, each being pressed against the preceding bale by the arms of the feed bar. The speed of feed is controlled by the operator. "On silage bales, the plastic wrap is overlapped 75%, giving four layers of film. A 50% overlap gives two layers, which is usually sufficient for wrapping hay or straw bales," explains Anderson. "A two-person crew one to operate the machine and one to load bales onto it can wrap about 400 silage bales, or 500 hay or straw bales, in a day. There is no limit to the number of bales making up the wrapped line, apart from space restictions. Succeeding tubes of bales can be formed alongside the first. For feeding, bales are simply lifted up and out with a tractor loader. This lifting action breaks the seal. You don't even have to cut the plastic."
The Tube-Line" (U.S. patent pending) is being introduced in Scotland and England at a retail price of right at $7,000. Anderson welcomes inquiries from interested North American dealers, distributors and manufacturers.
Contact: FARM SHOW Followup, David Anderson, Avaulds Farm, Turriff, Aberdeenshire, Scotland AB5 7RY.

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1987 - Volume #11, Issue #5